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Welcome, stealprankers...

You know, watching the last episode of Grimm, I tried in vain to envision what the new creature's name was supposed to mean. There were actually two, a catlike one and a birdlike one. The latter was easy "Seltenvogel" which technically translates to...well, bubkis because it's not a legitimate German word or phrase at all but it is clearly MEANT to say "Rare bird" - "seltener Vogel". (Laying a golden egg that was called "Unbezahlbar". I know, I know). The actors struggle valiantly through the German pronounciation, though neither of them can actually say "Wesen" correctly. It's still "vessen". ARGH!

But at least I could understand it. The word they used for the catlike creature had me completely stumped. Now I looked it up and it was supposed to be...

"Klaustreich"

What the hell???

Sure, you can - with vivid imagination - see a meaning in it, it's a mixture of the German words for "steal" and "prank". And maybe with very, VERY vivid imagination, I can see how that relates to an alleycat. But mostly I'm still going: What the hell?

Also, I will make that my new curse word for someone, like "oh shut up, you stupid Klaustreich". *g*

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Comments

( 23 have dazzled me — Dazzle me )
scolaro
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:07 pm (UTC)
I would really, really love to know how they come up with those names.
Is there someone going through (online?) dictionaries, just combining two words or phrases that fall out?
At any rate, there doesn't seem to be a native speaker involved at all in the process.
astri13
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:15 pm (UTC)
At any rate, there doesn't seem to be a native speaker involved at all in the process.

I know. And they could probably get anyone in fandom do it for free.

It does make for some hilarity watching as a German speaker but also leads to some despair. Add to that the fact that German isn't the easiest language to speak anyway and "Seltenvogel" was pronounced more like "Zeltenwogel".

Oh, and how they struggled with "unbezahlbar". :D

Couldn't make heads or tails out of "Klaustrike" as pronounced until I read the word and headdesked.
legoline
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:22 pm (UTC)
Should I cross my fingers now that they'll have to pronounce "Eichhörnchen" at some point? :-)
astri13
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:29 pm (UTC)
Oh God... I can see it now, the "Eykhornken" "vessen". *g*
legoline
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:31 pm (UTC)
I can see it now, the "Eykhornken" "vessen". *g*
See, that actually looks more like Swedish to me :D "Zwei auf einen Klaustreich!"
scolaro
Apr. 8th, 2012 07:55 am (UTC)
Haha, great idea, would love to see/hear that!

BTW, I just found that someone ranted about the whole German translation thing on the official Grimm boards: The Abominable Molestation of the German Language as featured in Grimm . (And no, I don't see a difference between the early eps and the ones after they supposedly decided to hire a "German language consultant".)
astri13
Apr. 8th, 2012 12:02 pm (UTC)
They...they claim they hired a German consultant? Who approved "Fuchsbau" and "Klaustreich"? Is his name Mr.Babel Fish by any chance? *headdesk*
scolaro
Apr. 8th, 2012 03:32 pm (UTC)
They didn't say he was a native speaker...probably a student with a two-week crash course in German or something.
scolaro
Apr. 8th, 2012 07:43 am (UTC)
I actually heard the word right, but was wondering for the rest of the episode what on earth they meant by it. It's grand, though, how Silas Weir Mitchell can keep a straight face, pretending to know exactly what he's saying. No doubt it works well with the US audience, but of course he can't fool us. ^^
legoline
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:13 pm (UTC)
You know, this would be a perfect word to use in a fandom wank situation. "WTF you Klaustreich." :D
astri13
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:16 pm (UTC)
Haha, yeah, that would totally fit. *g*
legoline
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:21 pm (UTC)
Alternatively, "But what are your thoughts on Klaustreich?" :D
astri13
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:23 pm (UTC)
I'm firmly against it. *nods*
legoline
Apr. 7th, 2012 09:31 pm (UTC)
Definitely. Think of the children!
gwendolen
Apr. 7th, 2012 10:18 pm (UTC)
Maybe they were thinking of "paw" (Klaue)and "with a strike" (mit einem Streich)? That might even make minimal sense for a catlike creature.

The best way to trip up an English-speaker is with a word like Zwetschge. Turns into smething like Zwesshe.
astri13
Apr. 7th, 2012 10:52 pm (UTC)
Maybe they were thinking of "paw" (Klaue)and "with a strike" (mit einem Streich)? That might even make minimal sense for a catlike creature.

Ha, I didn't even think of that until now. I wonder why they didn't go for "Klauestreich" if so. It's not much different from "Hexenbeast", "Blutbad" (and my fave, its plural Blutbaden) or "Fuchsbau"! for a fox-like creature.

Their naming skills are just...out of this world.

The best way to trip up an English-speaker is with a word like Zwetschge. Turns into smething like Zwesshe.

Hee. Yes. Everything with "shh" sounds trips them up. I once had an Irish guy try "Fischer's Fritz fischt frische Fische". *g*
queeberquabbler
Apr. 8th, 2012 12:41 am (UTC)
Klaustreich?! Unglaublich! That's got to be some of the worst TV "German" in history.
astri13
Apr. 8th, 2012 12:04 pm (UTC)
That's got to be some of the worst TV "German" in history.

It really is. I mean, one some level it is unintentionally hilarious but I'm imagining some touristy type trying it out, thinking they know some actual German phrases. Yikes.
rheasilvia
Apr. 8th, 2012 01:02 am (UTC)
ROFLMAO!

So that's what that was supposed to mean! I couldn't puzzle it out at all. Klaustreich!!

The actors struggle valiantly through the German pronounciation, though neither of them can actually say "Wesen" correctly.

I love the way you put that. :-) So true! You can see them gearing up for some of these words. They do try hard, poor things. *patpat*
astri13
Apr. 8th, 2012 12:06 pm (UTC)
I couldn't puzzle it out at all.

Me neither. I just had to look it up. Normally, I can at least hear what they are going for with the creature but this time? Nada.

You can see them gearing up for some of these words.

Haha. Everytime one had to say "unbezahlbar", they did that thing where they went rushing through it in the hopes to get it over quickly. :D
leelust
Apr. 8th, 2012 02:34 am (UTC)
Hee sometimes i wish i watch grimm only because of your funny comments :)
astri13
Apr. 8th, 2012 12:06 pm (UTC)
Well, the show ain't too bad but for a native German speaker, it sometimes can be trying. :D
lovis
Apr. 8th, 2012 02:54 pm (UTC)
Hee, I love reading comments from Germans about that show. Always hilarious. But I actually had to stop watching it because of the "abominable molestation". Just could't stand it.
( 23 have dazzled me — Dazzle me )